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05.03.2019
Category: 2014
Written by: Nick Jack
Hits: 207

Power training is a very unique training method that is often misunderstood, neglected and even abused in many strength programs. In simple terms power is the ability to exert maximum muscular contraction instantly in an explosive burst of movement. Most sporting and athletic activities require a fair degree of explosive power, whether it is needed to move explosively to hit a golf ball or tennis ball, jump, sprint, break away from an opponent, react to an opponents offensive tactic or handle an open-field hit, the need to produce power is an essential component. But it is not limited to sports with many daily activities also requiring this ability. We need power and speed to complete simple tasks like getting out of a chair, walking up stairs, or crossing a road quickly. When you understand that we lose this ability very quickly if nothing is done to prevent it, you begin to see just how important power training is to ALL of us. This article we explain how to not only preserve it, but improve your power no matter what age you are.

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25.02.2019
Category: 2014
Written by: Nick Jack
Hits: 1316

Ask anyone who plays in sports like AFL football and basketball how tough it can be to train for speed and power, yet at the same time try to improve your fitness endurance capacity. Many sports demand that you have high levels of strength and power and be able to sustain these repeated bursts in games that last between 2-3 hours. Physiologically the two processes of building strength, power, and speed versus endurance are completely opposed to each other and training both methods at the same time cancels out their effectiveness. This is the equivalent of trying to be a 100m sprinter and a marathon runner at the same time! All good strength coaches and elite athletes are aware of this principle and know that to improve performance these two opposing methods are best trained on their own which is known as periodization. Unfortunately, sporting codes that run for several months of the year do not allow for this perfect recipe to be adopted. Compromises must be made, and usually, it is strength, power, and speed sacrificed for fitness and endurance. But is there a way you can minimize the losses of strength and power by adopting smarter implementation of your fitness training? This is the question we explore in this article and provide you with some simple ideas you can implement into your training that could be a real game changer.

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19.02.2019
Category: 2014
Written by: Nick Jack
Hits: 257

The amount of hip and knee related injuries we see with people over 40 is becoming increasingly common. We know that exercise can be a great way to prevent the onset of these injuries but being able to train when you have hip and knee injury or stiffness can be very painful. Doing nothing is not a solution either as the joint will become weaker and more unstable resulting in a much bigger problem and a continuation of more pain. In one of our previous articles we provided some great ideas for training with severe knee pain (see best exercises for severe knee pain) which prompted many emails asking about the relevance of these exercises if you had a hip problem. There is a direct link with hip dysfunction to knee pain. For many surgery may seem like the best solution, yet I have met several people in their late 40's and early 50's who have had knee replacements only to be left in more pain than they had before the operation. Or worse still, developed other injuries and complications as a result of the surgery! This article we look at the reasons behind chronic problems at the hip and the knee and what you can do about it and try to avoid surgery if you can. Sometimes it may be all you can do, but it should be the last resort and the only option left after all alternatives have been tried first.

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